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Citation Styles: SBL

Guides to SBL Style in Order of Authority (with the column to the right in last position):

"SBL Handbook of Style: Explanations, Clarifications, and Expansions"

A Few Basic Examples (Perisho)

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RefWorks

RefWorks is a tool for managing all your citations.

  • Organize citations into folders by class or topic.
  • Automatically create formatted references lists.
  • Use within Word to create formatted in-text citations.

Learn more by taking a tutorial,  viewing a Quick-Start Guide (pdf), or using the RefWorks libguide.

You can export citations from many databases into RefWorks.  Just look for an "Export" link.

Introduction

The authoritative guide to SBL citation style is first

Consult that first for any Explanations, Clarifications, and Expansions, and only then

See also, however,

  • the boxes below for some tentative and non-authoritative examples and interpretations in application, many of them composed with fear and trembling before the official SBL blog was created, and not properly modified since.

Each box contains an example of

  1. the first footnote for a given title, numbered always "6." in the examples below,
  2. a subsequent footnote for the same title, numbered always "17." in the examples below (SBL style does not rule on ibid. (cf. p. 70), though Chicago style allows for an non-italicized use of it), and
  3. the bibliographical entry

for the Notes and Bibliography option:

Later I hope to add counterparts for the Author-Date and Works Cited option.

The SBL Handbook of Style guides more than simply Citation Style (sec. 6, pp. 68-108). See, for example, secs. 4 (on General Style, pp. 12-54), 5 (on Transliterating and Transcribing Ancient Texts, pp. 55-67), and 8 (on Abbreviations, pp. 117-260).

For some of the general rules, added as questions about them arise, see the box at the bottom labelled Further Notes on SBL Style.

Book by a Single Author (6.2.1)

6. Brian Bantum, Redeeming Mulatto: A Theology of Race and Christian Hybridity (Waco, TX: Baylor University Press, 2010), 75.

17. Bantum, Redeeming Mulatto, 83.

Bantum, Brian. Redeeming Mulatto: A Theology of Race and Christian Hybridity. Waco, TX: Baylor University Press, 2010.

Author-Date and Works Cited:

Book by Two or Three Authors (6.2.2)

6. David R. Nienhuis and Robert W. Wall, Reading the Epistles of James, Peter, John, and Jude as Scripture: The Shaping and Shape of a Canonical Collection (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2013), 17.

17. Nienhuis and Wall, Reading the Epistles of James, Peter, John, and Jude as Scripture, 13.

Nienhius, David R., and Robert W. Wall. Reading the Epistles of James, Peter, John, and Jude as Scripture: The Shaping and Shape of a Canonical Collection. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2013.

 

Author-Date and Works Cited:

Book by More Than Three Authors (6.2.3)

6. Bernard Brandon Scott et al., Reading New Testament Greek (Peabody, MA: Hendrickson, 1993), 53.

17. Scott et al., Reading New Testament Greek, 42.

Scott, Bernard Brandon, Margaret Dean, Kristen Sparks, and Frances LaZar. Reading New Testament Greek. Peabody, MA: Hendrickson, 1993.

Translated Volume (6.2.4)

6. Miriam Adeney, Femmes musulmanes: Construire des ponts avec elles, trans. Evelyne Zwahlen (Thoune, Switzerland: Edition Sénevé, 2005), 34.

17. Adeney, Femmes musulmanes, 34.

Adeney, Miriam.  Femmes musulmanes: construire des ponts avec elles.  Translated by Evelyne Zwahlen.  Thoune, Switzerland: Edition Sénevé, 2005.

Author-Date and Works Cited:

Book with One Editor (6.2.6)

6. Daniel Castelo, ed., Holiness as a Liberal Art (Eugene, OR:  Pickwick, 2012), 42.

17. Castelo, Holiness as a Liberal Art, 43.

Castelo, Daniel, ed. Holiness as a Liberal Art.  Eugene, OR:  Pickwick, 2012.

Author-Date and Works Cited:

Book with Two or Three Editors (6.2.7)

6. Paul L. Gavrilyuk, Douglas M. Koskela, and Jason E. Vickers, eds., Immersed in the Life of God: The Healing Resources of the Christian Faith:  Essays in Honor of William J. Abraham (Grand Rapids:  Eerdmans, 2008), 115.

17. Gavrilyuk, Koskela, and Vickers, 51.

Gavrilyuk, Paul L., Douglas M. Koskela, and Jason E. Vickers, eds. Immersed in the Life of God: The Healing Resources of the Christian Faith:  Essays in Honor of William J. Abraham. Grand Rapids:  Eerdmans, 2008.

Author-Date and Works Cited:

Book with Four or More Editors (6.2.8)

6. Douglas M. Strong et al., eds., Reclaiming the Wesleyan Tradition: John Wesley’s Sermons for Today (Nashville: Discipleship Resources, 2007), 103.

17. Strong et al., eds., Reclaiming the Wesleyan Tradition, 101.

Strong, Douglas M., Sarah B. Dorrance, Robert McDonald-Walker, Ingrid Yang, and Kevin M. Watson, eds.  Reclaiming the Wesleyan Tradition: John Wesley’s Sermons for Today. Nashville: Discipleship Resources, 2007.

 

 Author-Date and Works Cited:

Book with Both Author and Editor (6.2.9)

Book with Author, Editor, and Translator (6.2.10)

Article in an Edited Volume (6.2.12)

6. Robert Drovdahl, "The Developmental Use of Mentoring," in Nuture That Is Christian: Developmental Perspectives on Christian Education, ed. Jim Wilhite and John Dettoni (Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1995), 233.

17. Drovdahl, "The Developmental Use of Mentoring," 226.

Drovdahl, Robert. "The Developmental Use of Mentoring."  Pages 225-34 in Nuture That Is Christian: Developmental Perspectives on Christian Education. Edited by Jim Wilhite and John Dettoni. Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1995.

6. John Wesley, "Christian Perfection" (Sermon 40 (1741)), in John Wesley's Sermons: An Anthology, ed. Albert C. Outler and Richard P. Heitzenrater (Nashville: Abingdon Press, 1991), 82.

17. Wesley, "Christian Perfection," 79.

Wesley, John. "Christian Perfection" (Sermon 40 (1741)). Pages 70-84 in John Wesley's Sermons: An Anthology. Edited by Albert C. Outler and Richard P. Heitzenrater. Nashville: Abingdon Press, 1991.

Author-Date and Works Cited:

Article in a Festschrift (6.2.13)

6. Frank Anthony Spina, "The 'Face of God': Esau in Canonical Context," in The Quest for Context and Meaning: Studies in Biblical Intertextuality in Honor of James A. Sanders, ed. Craig A. Evans and Shemaryahu Talmon (Leiden: Brill, 1997), 9-10.

17. Spina, "The 'Face of God,'" 23.

Spina, Frank Anthony. "The 'Face of God': Esau in Canonical Context." Pages 3-25 in The Quest for Context and Meaning: Studies in Biblical Intertextuality in Honor of James A. Sanders. Edited by Craig A. Evans and Shemaryahu Talmon. Leiden: Brill, 1997.

Author-Date and Works Cited:

Introduction, Preface, or Foreword Written by Someone Other Than the Author (6.2.14)

6. Douglas M. Strong, introduction to Rediscovering an Evangelical Heritage: A Tradition and Trajectory of Integrating Piety and Justice, by Donald W. Dayton and Douglas M. Strong, 2nd ed. (Grand Rapids:  Baker Academic, 2014), 17.

Note: the actual title of this introduction ("Introduction to the Second Edition (2014): A Tradition of Integrated Faith") does not appear at 6.2.14 in The SBL handbook of Style. Note also that because the example in The SBL Handbook of Style is a 1st edition, I have had to innovate a bit at that point here.

17. Strong, introduction, 36.

Strong, Douglas M. Introduction to Rediscovering an Evangelical Heritage: A Tradition and Trajectory of Integrating Piety and Justice, by Donald W. Dayton and Douglas M. Strong. 2nd ed. Grand Rapids: Baker Academic, 2014.

Note: the title of the introduction ("Introduction to the Second Edition (2014): A Tradition of Integrated Faith") does not appear at 6.2.14 in The SBL handbook of Style. Note also that because the example in The SBL Handbook of Style is a 1st edition, I have had to innovate a bit at that point here.

6. Albert C. Outler and Richard P. Heitzenrater, introduction to "Christian Perfection" (Sermon 40 (1741)), in John Wesley's Sermons: An Anthology, ed. Albert C. Outler and Richard P. Heitzenrater (Nashville: Abingdon Press, 1991), 69.

17. Outler and Heitzenrater, introduction to "Christian Perfection," 69.

Outler, Albert C., and Richard P. Heitzenrater. Introduction to "Christian Perfection" (Sermon 40 (1741)). Page 69 in John Wesley's Sermons: An Anthology. Edited by Albert C. Outler and Richard P. Heitzenrater. Nashville: Abingdon Press, 1991.

Author-Date and Works Cited:

Revised Edition (6.2.16)

Multivolume Work (6.2.20)

Titled Volume in a Multivolume Work (6.2.21)

Chapter within a Multivolume Work (6.2.22)

Chapter within a Titled Volume in a Multivolume Work (6.2.23)

6. Nancy T. Ammerman, "North American Protestant Fundamentalism," in Fundamentalisms Observed, ed. Martin E. Marty and R. Scott Appleby, vol. 1 of The Fundamentalism Project, ed. Martin E. Marty and R. Scott Appleby (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1991), 21.

17. Ammerman, "North American Protestant Fundamentalism," 29-38.

Ammerman, Nancy T. "North American Protestant Fundamentalism."  Pages 1-65 in Fundamentalisms Observed.  Edited by Martin E. Marty and R. Scott Appleby.  Vol. 1 of The Fundamentalism Project.  Edited by Martin E. Marty and R. Scott Appleby.  Chicago:  University of Chicago Press, 1991.

Work in a Series (6.2.24)

6. Bo Lim, The 'Way of the Lord' in the Book of Isaiah, LHBOTS 522 (London: T & T Clark International, 2010), 131-57.

17. Lim, "The 'Way of the Lord,'" 141.

Lim, Bo. The 'Way of the Lord' in the Book of Isaiah.  LHBOTS 522.  London: T & T Clark International, 2010.

Note: At SPU it is permissible to spell bibliographical abbreviations out:  Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies.

Author-Date and Works Cited:

Electronic Book (6.2.25)

6. Robert W. Wall, Why the Church? RNT (Nashville: Abingdon, 2015), EBL edition, ch. 3.

17. Wall, Why the Church? ch. 4.

Wall, Robert W.  Why the Church? RNT. Nashville: Abingdon, 2015. EBL edition.

 

Note: "If citing a PDF e-book that is identical in all respects to the print edition, it is not necessary to indicate the format consulted.  However, because other electronic formats do not conform in all respects to the print edition, in those cases authors must indicate the format consulted.... Since e-reader formats do not have stable page numbers, it is preferable to cite the print edition.  However, if an alternative format is consulted, in lieu of a page number, include a chapter or section number...."  This e-book would actually be an example of one "identical in all respects to the print edition" and therefore possessing "stable page numbers", but I cite it here as if this were not the case. "When citing an online version of a book, include the DOI.  In the absence of a DOI, include the URL" (91), as follows:

Older work (in this case the reprint of the translation of a commentary) "made available freely online":  an interpretation of secs. 6.2.17-18, 6.2.25, and 6.4.9, NOW SUPERCEDED TO SOME EXTENT BY THE FOLLOWING SBL BLOG POSTS"Citing Text Collections 6:  ANF and NPNF"Text optional according to secs. 6.2.18 (p. 88) and 6.2.25 (p. 91) in redRemember that "it is preferable to cite the print edition.  However, if an alternative format is consulted, in lieu of a page number, include a chapter or section number in the citation" (6.2.25, p. 91, as in the case of the Christian Classics Ethereal Library (CCEL) examples below, where "vol. 2 at Luke 12:17" and "vol. 2 at Luke 12:13" replace the volume-and-page numbers "2:149" and 2:146").  Note that the translator is especially important in this case because there is at least one other translator of Calvin's Harmonia, namely A. W. Morrison:

6. John Calvin, Commentary on a Harmony of the Evangelists, Matthew, Mark, and Luke, trans. William Pringle, 3 vols. (Edinburgh: Calvin Translation Society, 1845-1846; repr., Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1965), 2:149, http://hdl.handle.net/2027/uva.x000210834?urlappend=%3Bseq=155.

6. John Calvin, Commentary on a Harmony of the Evangelists, Matthew, Mark, and Luke, trans. William Pringle, 3 vols. (Edinburgh: Calvin Translation Society, 1845-1846; repr., Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1965), vol. 2 at Luke 12:17, http://www.ccel.org/ccel/calvin/calcom32.ii.xxv.html.

17. Calvin, Commentary on a Harmony of the Evangelists, 2:146, http://hdl.handle.net/2027/uva.x000210834?urlappend=%3Bseq=152.

17. Calvin, Commentary on a Harmony of the Evangelists, vol. 2 at Luke 12:13, http://www.ccel.org/ccel/calvin/calcom32.ii.xxv.html.

Calvin, John. Commentary on a Harmony of the Evangelists Matthew, Mark, and Luke. Translated by William Pringle. 3 vols. Edinburgh: Calvin Translation Society. 1845-1846. Repr. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1965. http://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/009795296.

 

Calvin, John. Commentary on a Harmony of the Evangelists Matthew, Mark, and Luke. Translated by William Pringle. 3 vols. Edinburgh: Calvin Translation Society. 1845-1846. Repr. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1965. http://www.ccel.org/ccel/calvin/calcom32.i.html.

 

Author-Date and Works Cited:

 

Journal Article (6.3.1)

6. Richard B. Steele, "Christian Virtue and Ministry to Persons with Disabilities," JRDH 1 (2010): 28-46.

17. Steele, "Christian Virtue," 37.

Steele, Richard B.  "Christian Virtue and Ministry to Persons with Disabilities." JRDH 1 (2010): 28-46.

Note:  at SPU it is permissible to spell bibliographic abbreviations out:  Journal of Religion, Disability, and Health.

Author-Date and Works Cited:

Article in an Encyclopedia or a Dictionary (6.3.6)

6. Kerry Dearborn, "Celtic Spirituality and Theology," GDT 143.

17. Dearborn, "Celtic Spirituality," 144.

Dearborn, Kerry. "Celtic Spirituality and Theology." GDT 143-45.

Note: at SPU is is permissible to spell bibliographic abbreviations out:  Global Dictionary of Theology.

Author-Date and Works Cited:

6. Jeffrey F. Keuss, "Baptism IV. Literature," EBR 3:467.

17. Keuss, "Baptism," 3:466.

Keuss, Jeffrey F.  "Baptism IV. Literature." EBR 3:466-67.

Note: at SPU is is permissible to spell bibliographic abbreviations out:  Encyclopedia of the Bible and Its Reception.

Author-Date and Works Cited:

Article in a Lexicon or a Theological Dictionary (6.3.7)

NOTE:  IT IS VERY IMPORTANT NOW TO CONSULT ON THIS TOPIC THIS SERIES OF OFFICIAL SBL POSTS, AND TO PRIORITIZE WHAT THEY SAY OVER ANYTHING ONCE SAID HERE.

Note:  To create Greek and Hebrew, cut and paste from Web-based tools like http://www.lexilogos.com/keyboard/hebrew.htm and http://www.typegreek.com/ (see me for help with this, if necessary). But change the font at that specific point in your document to something like Times New Roman.

Note:

  • "For the discussion of a word or a family of words, give the entire title and page range of the article" (6.3.7).  At SPU, by contrast, any of the following (rather than "the entire title") will be acceptable:   "οἰκονομία; . . . οἰκονόμος; . . .  οἰκονομέω," OR "οἰκονομία, οἰκονόμος, οἰκονομέω," OR "οἰκονομία κτλ.," OR "οἰκονομία," etc.
  • "For the discussion of a specific word in an article covering a larger group of words, name just the word discussed and those pages on which it is discussed" (6.3.7), assuming that the main discussion of said word is thus localized.

Exegetical Dictionary of the New Testament (article-specific authors):

6. Jan-Adolph Bühner, "καθίστημι, καθιστάνω," EDNT 2:225-26.

17. EDNT 2:225.

Balz, Horst, and Gerhard Schneider, eds. Exegetical Dictionary of the New Testament. Translated by Virgil P. Howard, John W. Medendorp, and James W. Thompson. 3 vols. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1990-1993.

 

Exegetical Dictionary of the New Testament (no article-specific authors)

 

Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament and Other Early Christian Literature (no article-specific authors)

 

Theological Dictionary of the New Testament (article-specific authors):

6. Hans Conzelmann, "φῶς κτλ.," TDNT 9:310-58.

17. TDNT 9:326.

Kittel, Gerhard, and Gerhard Friedrich, eds. Theological Dictionary of the New Testament. Translated by Geoffrey W. Bromiley. 10 vols. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1964-1976.

 

New International Dictionary of New Testament Theology and Exegesis (no article-specific authors):

6. "οἰκονομία; . . . οἰκονόμος; . . .  οἰκονομέω," NIDNTTE 3:465-69.

17. NIDNTTE 3:467.

Silva, Moisés, ed. New International Dictionary of New Testament Theology and Exegesis. 2nd ed. 5 vols. Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 2014.

 

Theological Lexicon of the New Testament (article-specific author is always Spicq):

6. "εὐαγγελίζομαι, εὐαγγέλιον, εὐαγγελιστής," TLNT 2:82-92.

17. TLNT 2:83.

Spicq, Ceslas. Theological Lexicon of the New Testament. Translated by James D. Ernest. 3 vols. Peabody, MA: Hendrickson, 1994.

Paper Presented at a Professional Society [or Lecture] (6.3.8)

Note that, unlike Chicago style, SBL style places date before month and year.  Why, I have no idea:

Paper Presented at a Professional Society

6. Richard B. Steele,"Teaching Christian Prison Literature in Prison" (paper presented at the Church History Section of the Pacific Northwest Regional Meeting of the AAR/SBL, Portland, OR, 11 May 2012), 3.

17. Steele, "Teaching Christian Prison Literature," 7.

Steele, Richard B. "Teaching Christian Prison Literature in Prison." Paper presented at the Church History Section of the Pacific Northwest Regional Meeting of the AAR/SBL, Portland, OR, 11 May 2012.

 

Lecture

6. Richard B. Steele, "Maximus Confessor and the Monothelite Controversy" (THEO 6020 lecture, Seattle Pacific Seminary, Seattle, WA, 3 November 2015).

17. Steele, "Maximus Confessor."

Steele, Richard B. "Maximus Confessor and the Monothelite Controversy." THEO 6020 lecture, Seattle Pacific Seminary, Seattle, WA, 3 November 2015.

 

Power Point Presentation

6. Richard B. Steele, "Maximus Confessor and the Monothelite Controversy" (THEO 6020 Power Point presentation, Seattle Pacific Seminary, Seattle, WA, 3 November 2015), slide 47.

17. Steele, "Maximus Confessor," slide 15.

Steele, Richard B. "Maximus Confessor and the Monothelite Controversy." THEO 6020 Power Point presentation, Seattle Pacific Seminary, Seattle, WA, 3 November 2015.

Electronic Journal Article (6.3.10)

6. Jeff Keuss, "The Emergent Church and Neo-Correlational Theology after Tillich, Schleiermacher, and Browning," SJT 61 (2008): 452, doi:10.1017/S0036930608004201.

17. Keuss, "The Emergent Church," 459.

Keuss, Jeff. "The Emergent Church and Neo-Correlational Theology after Tillich, Schleiermacher, and Browning." SJT 61 (2008): 450-61. doi:0.1017/S0036930608004201.

Note: "electronic journal article citations should include a DOI (preferred) or a URL. The URL must resolve directly onto the page on which the article appears. Both DOI and URL may be included if desired" (95).  At SPU it is permissible to spell bibliographic abbreviations out:  Scottish Journal of Theology.

Author-Date and Works Cited:

Ancient Epistles and Homilies (6.4.4)

Here is an example of an ancient epistle lifted out of two different translations-in-print and mounted on two different web pages.  Because the reader may not actually have consulted the "original" in print, the material in red is optional:

6. Pelagius, Letter to Demetrias, par. 3 (Van de Weyer).

17. Pelagius, Letter to Demetrias, par. 4.

Pelagius.  Letter to Demetrias.  Translated by Robert Van de Weyer.  Page __ in The Letters of Pelagius: Celtic Soul Friend.  Evesham: Arthur James, 1995.  http://silouanthompson.net/library/early-church%20/pelagius-to-demetrias/.

Only in this case, though (a reproduction of the standard translation), is the uniform system of reference embedded:

6. Pelagius, Letter to Demetrias 2.1 (Rees).

17. Pelagius, Letter to Demetrias 2.2.

Pelagius, Letter to Demetrias. Translated by B. R. Rees.  Pages 35-70 in The Letters of Pelagius and his Followers.  Woodbridge, Suffolk: Boydell Press, 1991. http://epistolae.ccnmtl.columbia.edu/letter/1296.html.

Here is another.  Because the EWTN obscures the fact that it has reproduced the Butterworth translation, the material in red is optional.  Because it drops the first and last three paragraphs of the Tome as present in Tanner, the "par." references are a non-standard EWTN-specific stop-gap.  The Tome of Leo is also called Epistle 28, the Epistle Dogmatica, and so forth:

6. Leo I, Tome, par. 9 (EWTN).

17. Leo I, Tome, par. 3.

Leo I. Tome. Translated by Robert Butterworth. Excerpted by the Eternal Word Television Network.  Pages 77-82 in Nicaea I to Lateran V. Vol. 1 of Decrees of the Ecumenical Councils. Edited by Norman P. Tanner, S.J. Washington, DC: Georgetown University Press, 1990. http://www.ewtn.com/faith/teachings/incac1.htm.

And here, another:

6. Ignatius, Epistle to the Ephesians 10 (Louth and Staniforth).

17. Ignatius, Ephesians 19.

Louth, Andrew, ed. Early Christian Writings: The Apostolic Fathers. Translated by Maxwell Staniforth and Andrew Louth. London: Penguin Books, 1987.

And here is an example of an ancient epistle without an established author, as translated in a print-based series and not reproduced online.  Note that at SPU it is permissible to spell the series (Library of Christian Classics) out:

6. Martyrdom of Polycarp 7.3 (Shepherd).

17. Martyrdom of Polycarp 2.4.

Martyrdom of Polycarp. Translated by Massey Hamilton Shepherd, Jr. Pages 149-158 in Early Christian Fathers. Edited by Cyril C. Richardson. LCC 1. Philadelphia: The Westminster Press, 1953.

Ancient Christian Commentary on Scripture (on the analogy of 6.4.1.1)

6. Jerome, Commentary on Haggai 1.11, trans. Alberto Ferreiro (ACCS OT 14:221) .

6. Jerome, Homilies on the Psalms 60, trans. Marie Liguori Ewald (ACCS OT 14:154).

6. John Cassian, Conference 9.18, trans. Owen Chadwick* (ACCS OT 14:154-55).

6. Origen, Homilies on Jeremiah 15.3.2, trans. John Clark Smith** (ACCS OT 14:173).

Note: Since the student would have to know how to procure it on the basis of the relevant footnote in a given volume of ACCS, information about the translator (in red) shall be considered entirely optional.  Nonetheless, see (in this case) ACCS OT 14:xiv, where a single asterisk (*) is said to indicate that the pre-existing translation utlized by editor Ferreiro has been only slightly updated, but a double asterisk (**), that it has been significantly amended.  Also, Nicole Tilford of SBL has suggested that the Augustine example at 6.4.5 (ANF and NPNF), rather than 6.4.1.1 (COS), be used as the model, and that ACCS OT be cited as a work in a series (6.2.24) rather than as a titled volume in a multivolume work (6.2.21), which is how I cite it in the bibliography entry below.

17. Jerome, Commentary on Haggai 1.11, ACCS OT 14:221.

Ferreiro, Alberto, ed. The Twelve Prophets. Vol. 14 of Ancient Christian Commentary on Scripture: Old Testament. Edited by Thomas C. Oden. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 2003.

Bible Commentaries (6.4.9)

6. Robert W. Wall and Richard B. Steele, 1 and 2 Timothy and Titus, THNTC (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2012), 83.

17. Wall and Steele, 1 and 2 Timothy and Titus, 420-21.

Wall, Robert W., and Richard B. Steele. 1 and 2 Timothy and Titus. THNTC. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2012.

Note: at SPU it is permissible to spell bibliographic abbreviations out: Two Horizons New Testament Commentary.

New Interpreter's Bible.  The New Interpreter's Bible falls under 6.4.9-10 and 6.2.21-23, which cannot be perfectly harmonized.  The following represents therefore my own best (albeit fallible) judgment.  The text in red appears on the authority of 6.2.20-22 rather than 6.4.9, and is therefore entirely optional. To me it remains unclear whether the title of the individual commentary should be placed between quotations marks or italicized, though I would prefer the latter:

6. Robert W. Wall, The Acts of the Apostles: Introduction, Commentary, and Reflections, in NIB 10, ed. Leander E. Keck (Nashville: Abingdon, 2002), 75-86.

17. Wall, The Acts of the Apostles, 81.

Wall, Robert W. The Acts of the Apostles: Introduction, Commentary, and Reflections. Pages 1-368 in vol. 8 of NIB.  Edited by Leander E. Keck. Nashville: Abingdon, 2002.

 

Author-Date and Works Cited:

Single Volume of a Multivolume Commentary in a Series (6.4.10)

Websites and Blogs (6.4.15)

See also now the "Citing URLs" entry on the SBL Handbook of Style website.

Website:

Blog ("Blog entries . . . may be omitted from the bibliography"):

6. Richard B. Steele, "They're Not Dancing," Dean's Desk (blog), Signposts from Seattle Pacific Seminary (blog), 11 March 2015, http://blog.spu.edu/signposts/theyre-not-dancing/.

17. Steele, "They're Not Dancing."

The Bible (8.2, 8.2.1, 8.3.2, and so forth)

Cite the Bible parenthetically in line rather in a footnote, as follows, using the abbreviations for the biblical books given in 8.3.1-2 (pp. 124-125), and those for translations and/or versions given in 8.2.1:

  • with chapter (and verse):
    • “When you fast, brush your hair and wash your face.” (Matt 6:17 CEB)  Alternatively:  “When you fast, brush your hair and wash your face” (Matt 6:17 CEB).  "Authors citing more than one translation of the Bible must indicate which translation is used in a particular [i.e. every individual] citation."  Otherwise the abbreviation for the translation in question need appear only the first time the Bible is quoted.
    • Dr. Ninehuis, citing Jas 2:1-7, says. . . .
    • First Timothy 3:15 is interpreted by Dr. Wall as follows: . . .  Here the reference is spelled out because it occurs at the beginning of a sentence.
  • without chapter (and verse):
    • Dr. Spina, commenting on First Kings, argues that. . . .
    • Isaiah is interpreted by Dr. Lim as an. . . .

Babylonian Talmud (8.3.8-10)

See sec. 8.3.8-10 (pp. 130-132) of The SBL Handbook of Style, Second Edition.  b. = Babylonian Talmud; Ḥul. or Ḥag. = the tractate; 98b and 18b = the page in the Hebrew (reverse of leaves 98 and 18 in both cases).  Text in red gives the translator, and is optional (would be omitted for the same tractate the second and all subsequent times):

6. b. Ḥul. 98b (Cashdan).

17. b. Ḥag. 18b (Rabbinowitz).

Epstein, Isidore, ed. The Hebrew-English Edition of the Babylonian Talmud. 30 vols. London:  The Soncino Press, 1965-1989.

Midrash Rabbah (8.3.8-10)

Cite "chapter" and subsection.  Elements in red represent clarifying personal (and therefore optional) additions to sec. 8.3.8-10 of The SBL Handbook of Style, Second Edition:

First in-text citation, where "Freedman" gives the translator, and "Freedman and Simon" refers to volume and page number of the edition in English.  The latter could be especially important in the case of a long "chapter" without enumerated subsections, for example Gen. Rab. 97 (Vayechi) (Freedman; Freedman and Simon 2:906).  Or, alternatively, I suppose, Gen. Rab 97 (Vayechi), at Gen. 49:9.

Gen. Rab. 92 (Mikketz).5 (Freedman; Freedman and Simon 2:851-852).

Subsequent in-text citation:

Gen. Rab. 92 (Mikketz).3 (Freedman and Simon 2:850).

First in-text citation:

Exod. Rab. 15 (Bo).30 (Lehrman; Freedman and Simon 3:203).

Second in-text citation:

Exod. Rab. 15 (Bo).24 (Freedman and Simon 3:195).

Bibliography:

Freedman, H., and Maurice Simon, eds. Midrash Rabbah. 10 vols. 3rd ed. London: Soncino, 1983.  Alternatively,
Freedman, H., trans. Genesis. Vols. 1-2 of Midrash Rabbah, ed. H. Freedman and Maurice Simon, 3rd ed. (London: Soncino, 1983).
Lehrman, S. M., trans. Exodus. Vol. 3 of Midrash Rabbah, ed. H. Freedman and Maurice Simon, 3rd ed. (London: Soncino, 1983).

Ante-Nicene Fathers (ANF), Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers (NPNF)

On the Ante-Nicene Fathers (ANF) and the Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers (NPNF), with some reference to the instantiation of those in the Christian Classics Ethereal Library (CCEL), see now "Citing Text Collections 6: ANF and NPNF" at SBL Handbook of Style:  Explanations, Clarifications, and Expansions.

Further Notes on SBL Style

Here are some further brief notes on SBL style, added as questions about them arise:

  • Chicago Style, Derivation from: "the second edition [of The SBL Handbook of Style] continues the practice of supplementing The Chicago Manual of Style." Indeed, it "reduces some differences” (Preface, p. xii). It "should supplement The Chicago Manual of Style (CMS), except in cases when the field very consciously and authoritatively adopts a different standard” (1.1, p. 1).
  • Author-Date and Works Cited option: the default option is Notes and Bibliography. But as with Chicago style, “Authors writing in the social sciences may elect to use an author-date [and works cited] form of citation rather than the more traditional note-based system”. For more on the author-date and works cited form of citation, see 6.5, on pp. 104-108.
  • Capitalization of Titles in English: in general, "all words … except articles, coordinating conjunctions, and prepositions.…"  But if first or last in a title or subtitle, then capitalize regardless.  For more detail (it being somewhat more complicated than that), see 6.1.3.3 (p. 73).  6.1.3.4 treats Capitalization of Titles Not in English.
  • Date of "Publication", Unknown:  "The use of n.d. (no date) in place of the year in publication details should be avoided" (6.1.4.5), and "SBL Press does not advocate including access dates" instead (6.4.15; cf. 6.1.6).  The Chicago Manual of Style, 16th ed.:  "When the publication date of a printed work cannot be ascertained, the abbreviation n.d. takes the place of the year in the publication details.  A guessed-at date may either be substituted (in brackets) or added. . . . A work for which no  . . . date can be determined or reasonably guessed at should be included in a bibliography only if accompanied by the location where a copy can be found" (14.152, underscoring mine).  "Citations of website content. . . . include a publication date or date of revision (see 14.8); if no such date can be determined, include an access date (see 14.7)" (14.245, underscoring mine).
  • Ellipses:  4.1.3 (pp. 15-16).
  • Ibid.:  Ibid. does not appear in the Index to The SBL Handbook, and is not mentioned in the fourth full paragraph on p. 70 ("Subsequent notes in the same work referring to the same source should use the abbreviated note form exhibited in the examples in §§6.2-4, including a shortened form of the main title of the work cited").  Yet Chicago style allows for it.  See The Chicago Manual of Style, 16th ed., 14.29 on p. 669; and Turabian, 8th ed., 16.4.2 on p. 161 ("In notes, ibid. should not be italicized; at the start of a note, it should be capitalized") and 17.5.1.1 on p. 189 (underscoring mine).
  • Possessives: "Following The Chicago Manual of Style, all names form the possessive with an apostrophe s. Jesus's and Moses's are not an exception to this rule" (p. 1, referencing 4.1.6 on pp. 16-17).
  • Quotation marks and punctuation (4.1.2):
    • periods and commas:  inside, unless one is engaged in "[1] close textual studies, in which it may be important to signal that the punctuation is not part of the quoted material . . . , and [2] linguistic or phonetic studies, where a foreign term is printed in italics, its definition follows within single quotation marks, and any punctuation is kept outside of the quotation marks. . . ."
    • question marks and exclamation points:  inside if part of the quoted material, outside if not.
    • colons and semicolons:  outside.
  • Sequence of Information: For "a general rule" on the sequence of information, especially useful when it is necessary to create an interpretation, see 6.1.1, p. 71.
  • Spaces: “Only one space is needed after any punctuation, whether within or at the end of a sentence” (2.1.3.5, p. 5).
  • Subtitle, Punctuation before a:  "except when double punctuation would result (e.g., following a question mark or exclamation point), a colon (not a period, semicolon, comma, or dash) should separate the title and subtitle. This rule may be applied regardless of the punctuation or lack thereof on the title page" (6.1.3.1, p. 72).
  • "Titles within titles should be set off by quotations marks (even though they are titles of books) and should be capitalized in the same style as the title that includes them. See CMS §§8.163, 8.171, and 14.102" (6.1.3.2).  If I read CMS §8.171 aright, this means that the title within the title should be distinguished by the quotation marks alone, not any reverse italicization:  A Key to Whitehead's "Process and Reality".  (For another example of this, see the citations I've created for the "Student Supplement to 'The SBL Handbook of Style, Second Edition'" (above).)  The one exception:  "Any term within an italicized title that would itself be italicized in running text—such as a foreign word, a genus name, or the name of a ship—should be set in roman type (reverse italics)":  From Tyrannosaurus rex to King Kong: Large Creatures in Fact and Fiction (453).