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Finding Full Text: SPU and Beyond

Use this guide to find out how to get the full text of desired books and articles.

NOTE:  THIS GUIDE MAY STILL REFER AT POINTS TO VISITING THE SPU, THE UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, AND THE PUBLIC LIBRARIES; TO SUMMIT BORROWING; AND TO INTERLIBRARY LOAN.  ALL UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON (AND PUBLIC) LIBRARY BUILDINGS (NOT TO MENTION, OF COURSE, THE AMES LIBRARY) ARE CURRENTLY CLOSED, SUMMIT BORROWING IS FOR THE TIME BEING SUSPENDED, AND WHAT IS AVAILABLE VIA INTERLIBRARY LOAN MAY BE FAIRLY LIMITED.

To see what resources are available while libraries are closed, see the Spring Quarter 2020 Finding the Full-Text Guide

Finding Full Text: An Overview

Step 1:  Find citation, using a database, Google Scholar as accessed via an SPU database list, or the SPU Library's discovery system.  (You may, of course, have been simply given a citation (author, title, date, etc.).)

Step 2:  Determine whether you're looking at the citation of

  • a book.  If what you're looking at is the citation of a book, then search the SPU Library's discovery system (set to SPU Library + Summit) for the book, and either
    • pull it off the shelf at SPU (Immediate Access via the SPU Library);
    • Login and open up the e-book (Immediate Access via the SPU Library);
    • Login and Place Summit request (Access within 3-5 days via Summit Borrowing); or, if necessary,
    • Request Interlibrary Loan from within Libraries Worldwide, i.e. WorldCat (Access within 14-21 days or so via InterLibrary Loan).
  • an essay in a book.  If what you're looking at is the citation of an essay in a book, then follow the instructions for the book, above.
  • an article in a periodical (journal, magazine).  If what you're looking at is the citation of an article in a periodical, then follow the remaining steps below:

Immediate Access via the SPU Library or the Internet

Step 3:  Look for an indication of the presence of full-text (for example an icon indicating the presence of PDF or HTML).  (SPU and other full text indexed by Google Scholar will appear in that venue, too, if accessed via SPU database lists.)

Step 4Check For Full Text (link in database) =Search for the periodical containing an article in the SPU Library's discovery system.  Should the former fail you, Check For Full Text is the equivalent of the latter, that is, an Advanced Search for the journal (not article)  title in the SPU Library's discovery system.  Thus, Title contains "Theological studies", limited to Material Type:  Journals and Search Scope:  SPU Library:

SPU Library search box with "Search Scope: SPU Library" highlighted, "Title", and "Material Type: Journals"

This will tell you if the Library subscribes to or holds the periodical (and which issues of it) in

Step 5:  Look for the periodical homepage over the Internet.  Some respectable journals make at least some back issues available at no charge from their own websites.

Access within 1 day via a Seattle Library

Step 6:  Consult the catalog of another library here in Seattle, for example those of the University of Washington and Seattle University, or the Seattle or King County public library systems.  It may be that you can get what you need in an hour or two by making a quick trip across town.

Access within 3-21 days via InterLibrary Loan

Step 7Request via Interlibrary Loan (link in database) =Request the article (or essay) via InterLibrary Loan.  To do this, click within an SPU database on Request via Interlibrary Loan or proceed to the manual InterLibrary Loan form.  Most (though not all) items requested via InterLibrary Loan become available within a few days.