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WRI 1100: Shim: Recognizing Scholarly Journals

Recognizing Scholarly Journal Articles

1. Some things to consider when determining if an article is peer reviewed (source):

  1. Make sure you have a journal article; also not everything in a peer-reviewed journal is peer reviewed, journals often other content such as editorials or book reviews which are not required to go through peer-review
  2. The following can usually be found in a peer-reviewed article
    • An extensive reference list with in-text citations
    • Specific style/organization: abstract, introduction, methods, results, conclusion
    • Data given in charts, tables or graphs
    • Formal language - particularly an long article title that covers all components discussed in the article
    • Includes dates for submission and acceptance of the article 

2. Some databases, like Academic Search Premier, allow you to click a check-box to say you only want peer reviewed journals.  Although sometimes databases only indicate that a resource is scholarly without covering the level of peer review the articles undergo.

3. Search the Journal's website for Author Guidelines:

4. Still not sure if your journal will count for one of your 5 refereed titles?  Ask a Librarian: cfry@spu.edu